ISBA2012

 

Presentations

Presentation Downloads

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All available presentation downloads and handouts are available below

A1 A Society for All Icelandic Policy on Families with Children with Disabilities

A1 Exploring Individualised Funding and its effect on current practice PPT

A2 Guiding Principles for Respite Models and Services National Respite Guidelines PPT

A2 The Evolution and Future of Lifespan Respite as a National Program PPT

A2 The Evolution and Future of Lifespan Respite as a National Program Handout

A3 Granbo Tour On the Road Again

A3 A Breathing Space for Family: Granbohus Respite Care

A4 Building Social Capital: A Primer to Get Beyond Respite (Are You a Positive Gatekeeper Handout

B1 Unlocking Community Resources at CS for Community Living

B2 Bringing Best Practiced Based Respite to Families at Jills House Early Lessons From a Respite Centre for Children with Intellectual Disabilities

B2 Collaborative Out of Home Respite Option

B3 Community Respite Model as an Alternative to Long Term Care Facility Respite

B3 Shared Lives and Short Breaks for People with Dementia

B4 Respite Key to Addressing Abuse

B5 Powerful Tools for Caregivers of Children with Special Healthcare Needs PPT

B5 Powerful Tools for Caregivers of Children with Special Healthcare Needs Handout

C1 Engaging Individuals Families in a Conversation Around Having a Good Life and Peace of Mind

C4 Unlocking Community Resources Through an Innovative Partnership Triangle

D1 Short Break Services to Families and Disabled Young People whose Behaviour is Severeley Challenging

D2 Validating Families Handout a

D2 Validating Families Handout b

D2 Validating Families Handout c

D2 Validating Families Handout d

D2 Validating Families Handout e

D2 Validating Families Handout g

D3 Fast and Easy Help in Short Break Research

D3 Fast and Easy Help in Short Break Research Handout

D3 The Family Respite Vacation

D4 Prioritising Access to Overnight Short Break Stays Based on Client and Carer Needs

D4 The Development and Use of a Standardized Eligibility Tool for Determining Eligibility for Respite

D5 Development Educational Assistance Program Going Off the DEAP End

D5 The Right Worker Providing the Right Support when the Family Needs It

E1 Preserving Children Youth Home Placement through Mental Health Respite

E3 Finding the Right People to Provide Short Break Care: The 'Key' to a Successful and Long Lasting Relationship PPT

E3 Finding the Right People to Provide Short Break Care  Resource Activity Guide 2012 Handout

E3 Finding the Right People to Provide Short Break Care Family-Worker Respite Care Booklet Handout

E3 The Promise of Marte Meo for Short Break Replacements

E4 Capturing the Costs and Outcomes of Short Break Services of Disabled Children and their Families

E5 Research and Recommendations Focused on Strengthening Opportunities for Social Development of Children and Youth with Disabilities in Communities (Strengthening Communities)

E5 Sisters and Brothers are Important Family Members

F1 ReVeAL Dance Creation Enhancing Opportunities for Artistic Expression, Communication, and Inclusion

F2 Building a Context for Relationships

F3 Competency Based Training Lifespan Respite Care Providers in New Hampshire

KEYNOTE DAY 1 Disability and Social Capital

Downloadable Resources

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Respite Care in Canada

Executive Summary

Respite care and services are not insured services under the Canada Health Act. Respite is considered part of home care services and depending on the jurisdiction may be partially publicly-funded. Most families pay out of pocket for respite services. Other families may go without respite services due to cost constraints.

An aging population and an aging family support system have major implications for respite services. There is variability in access to and provision of respite services and differences in the application of co-payments and user fees. Over the past decade, Canada’s health system has undergone considerable change. Care once delivered in the acute care sector is now delivered in the home or community; however, required hours of home and respite care may not be accessible.

The delivery of appropriate community, home, and facility-based respite services will continue to be a challenge until policy-makers realize its importance to the changing health system and focus on making access to these services more equitable across the country.

With this brief, the Canadian Healthcare Association, whose members span the country and the health continuum, urges governments to give the respite care sector and its caregivers the long-overdue policy recognition that they so deserve.

Download the brief here

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